The Field, Grey Glacier, Patagoniaby Greg Boratyn posted on 22.09.14

The FieldGrey Glacier, Patagonia
by Greg Boratyn

Tallinn, Estoniaby TOTORORO.RORO posted on 21.09.14

Tallinn, Estonia
by TOTORORO.RORO


posted on 10.09.14

bluedogeyes:

The White Buffalo & The Forest Rangers - Bohemian Rhapsody

posted on 10.09.14

(Source: honehhboii)

ho visto Fargo in ritardo e ho scoperto l’acqua calda: è bello, ma bello proprio! posted on 08.09.14

ho visto Fargo in ritardo e ho scoperto l’acqua calda: è bello, ma bello proprio!

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

wait a sec, I’ve never heard about the butcher origin, but I’d like to clarify a couple of things.
First of all, heels in the ancient times were used to avoid to get the shoes dirty. Shoes weren’t cheap and people aimed to used them the longer they can. But because shoes were mainly made of fabric and leather, they got dirty quickly and needed constant care. Therefore, who had enough wealth to avoid hard works (merchants, nobles, ect) started to wear wadges under their shoes to keep them clear. With time heels/wadges became a symbol of luxury and beauty, regardless of the gender.Actors represented the only exception, for they wore heels for the practical reason to be the more visible on stages.
Later, during the Middle Age, heels were used especially to get other people attention. Next to the idea of manhood linked with legs, more generally heels were used by both genders to appear taller, for a tall person was a synonymous of beauty and strength (people used to be waaay smaller than now). Moreover wealthy people loved to show off how rich they were by wearing long clothes. A longer dress needed more meters of fabrics and more fabric meant an higher price for the dress. So rich people wore heels also to be able to wear longer dresses, for the longer the better.This fashion became so common that governs emanated for centuries sumptuary laws that dictated, among others things, how long a dress could be depending on the social class of the owner, so to avoid social status misunderstandings. posted on 06.09.14

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

wait a sec, I’ve never heard about the butcher origin, but I’d like to clarify a couple of things.

First of all, heels in the ancient times were used to avoid to get the shoes dirty. Shoes weren’t cheap and people aimed to used them the longer they can. But because shoes were mainly made of fabric and leather, they got dirty quickly and needed constant care. Therefore, who had enough wealth to avoid hard works (merchants, nobles, ect) started to wear wadges under their shoes to keep them clear. With time heels/wadges became a symbol of luxury and beauty, regardless of the gender.
Actors represented the only exception, for they wore heels for the practical reason to be the more visible on stages.

Later, during the Middle Age, heels were used especially to get other people attention.
Next to the idea of manhood linked with legs, more generally heels were used by both genders to appear taller, for a tall person was a synonymous of beauty and strength (people used to be waaay smaller than now). Moreover wealthy people loved to show off how rich they were by wearing long clothes. A longer dress needed more meters of fabrics and more fabric meant an higher price for the dress. So rich people wore heels also to be able to wear longer dresses, for the longer the better.
This fashion became so common that governs emanated for centuries sumptuary laws that dictated, among others things, how long a dress could be depending on the social class of the owner, so to avoid social status misunderstandings.

posted on 06.09.14

asylum-art:

10 Breathtaking Satellite Photos That Will Change How You See Our World - dailyoverview

Tumblr, Facebook

Daily Overview is a new project that shares one satellite photo from Digital Globes a day in an attempt to change the way we see our planet Earth.
The project was inspired by the Overview Effect experience, which is a cognitive shift of perspective and worldview experienced by the astronauts when they get to see the planet Earth from space for the first time.

1.Bourtange, Vlagtwedde, Netherlands
2.Barcelona, Spain
3.Palm Island / Hibiscus Island, Miami Beach, Florida, USA
4.Residential Development, Killeen, Texas, USA
5.Plasticulture / Greenhouses, Almeria, Spain
6.New Bullards Bar Reservoir, Yuba County, California
7.Recession of the Dead Sea Neve Zohar, Israel
8.Desert Shores Community, Las Vegas, Nevada,
9.Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group, Tucson, Arizona, USA
10.Durrat Al Bahrain, Bahrain

I’M IN LOVE! totally worth-watching comedy posted on 06.09.14

I’M IN LOVE!
totally worth-watching comedy

(Source: burntheworld)

RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION Fall/Winter 2012 collection posted on 03.09.14

RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION
Fall/Winter 2012 collection

(Source: fashiion-gone-rouge)

posted on 02.09.14
“What was it that Granny Weatherwax had said once? ‘Evil begins when you begin to treat people as things.’ And right now it would happen if you thought there was a thing called a father, and a thing called a mother, and a thing called a daughter, and a thing called a cottage, and told yourself that if you put them all together you had a thing called a happy family.”

— Terry Pratchett, ‘I Shall Wear Midnight’ (via tardis60)

(Source: dephinia)

posted on 02.09.14

fyeah-aventuras-graficas:

“Hey! There’s a hole at the base of this stump! Wow! It’s a tunnel that opens onto a system of catacombs! I think I can squeeze through—”

(Source: fyeah-adventure-games)

Page 1 of 184